Albert Ciuksza

Vice President of Growth and Development

About Albert

Albert’s innovation-focused career has addressed challenges in organizations ranging from Fortune 500 companies to nonprofit tech-based economic development, and as a co-founder of several companies, he applies his diverse skill set and experience to building better bosses around the world.

As a startup co-founder, Albert built teams, led product development and commercialization, launched products internationally, and raised more than $1 million collectively. Two of the companies – Eyenavision and Draft Dynamics – remain in operation, with the former employing more than 20 people.

In previous roles supporting small businesses in nonprofit economic development, Albert served as the director of the Pittsburgh Impact Initiative for the Allegheny Conference on Community Development, then the manager of water innovations for Idea Foundry in conjunction with the Water Economy Network. In both roles, Albert worked directly with senior leaders and innovators to connect their companies with resources and business opportunities and coached them on strategies and approaches to yield success. He continues in formal and informal advisory roles today.

Albert is responsible for the development, implementation, and management of Solutions21’s leadership development programs.

Albert is a graduate of St. Vincent College in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, and earned his MBA at the Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business at the University of Pittsburgh. He resides in Bellevue, Pennsylvania, with his wife, Mallory, and two dogs.

Connect with Albert

Latest Insights from Albert

Don’t look up

Don’t look up

In times of uncertainty, teams tend to look up—to leaders and managers who direct their efforts—to guide their next steps. If those teams continue to feel discomfort, they often assign blame to those same leaders, thinking (and sometimes saying) that leadership should...

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Knowing is not doing

Knowing is not doing

There's knowing how to do something, then there's doing it. Popularized in the book The Knowing-Doing Gap, the authors contend that intellectual capital isn't enough to make things happen — that companies often fall into the "smart talk trap." They argue that...

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